Monthly Archives: October 2018

The Funeral Procession of Elizabeth I

Walter Raleigh, –gentleman, adventurer, explorer, spy, poet, soldier, politician,– was executed 400 years ago today.  The link below is to the funeral procession of Elizabeth I, in 1603.  Raleigh is in this procession, acting as Captain of the Guard. The … Continue reading

Posted in Elizabeth I, Walter Raleigh

Special issue of Open Access Journal Humanities about Pirates in Literature

Aargh, avast ye!  The Open Access journal Humanities is seeking submissions for a special issue about Pirates in Literature.  If this is of interest, please follow this link to the Humanities website and a description of manuscript submission.

Posted in Early modern seafaring, Naval History, Pirates

‘Tarontos Lac’: Geographer finds oldest known reference to Toronto on 340-year-old French map

A geographer has found what could be the earliest reference to Toronto on a map dated from 1678. In small lettering in one corner of the map was the name “Lac Tarontos,” written on what is now Lake Simcoe. The term … Continue reading

Posted in Colonial America, Maps

Minding the Gaps of Early Modern Drama

Was the Interregnum a “dramatic dead zone”?  Heidi Craig explores Drama in the years between the Civil War and the Restoration (1642-1660).  Go here for more (and have a look at the Lost Plays Database while you’re there).

Posted in Interregnum, Plays